Posted by: Jill Potts Jones | August 13, 2012

‘Salome’s Conversion’ by Rohn Federbush


(NOTE:  Normally, I do not read reviews of books I review until I complete my review.  The only exception is when I read a book I don’t particularly like.  In this case, I was surprised to find that “Salome’s Conversion” received 4 and 5 stars on Amazon.com.)

Salome was the daughter of Herodias and Philip and the step-daughter of King Herod, Philip’s brother.  As you will recall, John the Baptist was very critical of this marriage and was arrested because of his beliefs.  At the request of her mother, Salome, after impressing Herod with her erotic dancing, asked for the head of John the Baptist on a platter which she was granted.  “Salome’s Conversion”, loosely based on this event, follows Salome as she is taken by Decius Invictus, a Roman guard of the household, and Ide, her maidservant, to Mary, the mother of Jesus, the only place of refuge for the disgraced Salome.

Part historical fiction and part romance “Salome’s Conversion” weaves a story about disgrace and redemption as Salome finds the truth of John the Baptist’s message when she comes face to face with Jesus.  A nice diversion from the typical stories surrounding this particular era, “Salome’s Conversion” was still a difficult read.  Even though the Scripture quoted was accurate, she took liberties with the events surrounding it, for example, she used Decius as the person who told Jesus is mother and brothers were outside prompting Jesus to ask, “Who is my mother?  Who are my brothers?”

At 9:45 a.m. (CDT) on August 13, 2012, this book was listed for $41.25 at Amazon.com, $37.15 at Barnes & Noble and $45.41 at Books-a-Million.com.  Speaking only for myself, I would not be inclined to purchase at this price.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author, Rohn Federbush. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: