Posted by: Jill Potts Jones | April 22, 2010

“Will the World End in 2012?”: A Review of Raymond C. Hundley’s book


People have been discussing the end of the world and theories associated with it ever since the world began.  Most people agree that the end is imminent; they just don’t agree on the how, why or when.  Are we plummeting toward a cataclysmic disaster triggered by earthquakes and volcanoes, a science experiment gone awry or a collision with an unknown planet?  Or, as most Christians believe, has God ordained a day and time of which we do not know to send Christ back to Earth to bring home the redeemed and establish a new heaven and a new earth?

In his book, “Will the World End in 2012?” Raymond C. Hundley, Ph.D. covers 10 scenarios from predictions from scientists, Nostradamus, people claiming to have had contact with an alien lifeform and claims made by various world religions.   He urges Christians to respond to these predictions with hope and joy rather than fear. 

According to Dr. David Jeremiah (from Until Christ Returns),  the Old Testament contains 1,845 references to the end of the world and the New Testament has 318 references contained in 23 of the 27 books of the New Testament.  “For every biblical prophecy on the first coming of Christ, there are eight concerning His second coming,” states Dr. Jeremiah.

The final chapter of Dr. Hundley’s book explains to non-Christians (and Christians, too) how to prepare for the end of the world by accepting the salvation offered by Christ and explaining the plan of salvation.  As Christians we should be prepared whether the end comes in 2012, 2032 or tomorrow. 

As I read the preparation chapter, I began to realize how hypocritical Christians can sometimes be when it comes to death.  We walk in the faith of our salvation, but we fear death.  Why do we, as Christians, fear the day that will usher us into the presence of our Savior instead of looking forward to it with joy and anticipation?  We cover it up by saying, “It’s not the death I fear but the dying.”  I must confess that in the past I have had an unreasonable fear of death and dying.  I refused to take risks if there was any danger involved, and I probably still will because I am not a risktaker.  However, the older I get the more I am beginning to realize that death is not something to be feared but something to be faced with confidence, peace and joy.  What a testimony our life would be if we lived this way.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their blogger review program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Responses

  1. I think I would be interested in reading this book. I agree that as Christians we should not fear death. As Christians, in death is our crescendo, we are just getting to that place where our spirit man always wanted to be, completely in the presence of God at ALL times. In this flesh, our bodies cannot handle being in the presence of God at all times, but after death, oh what a joy we will have.

    I am curious about the research that Dr. Hundley has done on this subject, as it is a topic of discussion with many non-believers that I have come in contact with and would definitely like to get some concrete information so I would know how to respond.


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